reperiendi

Monads without category theory, redux

Posted in Category theory, Programming by Mike Stay on 2012 September 26

I intended the last version of this post to be a simple one-off, but people cared too much. A fire-breathing Haskellite said that jQuery must never be used as an example of a monad because it’s (gasp) not even functional! And someone else didn’t understand JavaScript well enough to read my code snippets. So here’s another attempt that acknowledges the cultural divide between functional and imperative programmers and tries to explain everything in English as well as in source code.

Monads are a design pattern that is most useful to functional programmers because their languages prefer to implement features as libraries rather than as syntax. In Haskell there are monads for input / output, side-effects and exceptions, with special syntax for using these to do imperative-style programming. Imperative programmers look at that and laugh: “Why go through all that effort? Just use an imperative language to start with.” Functional programmers also tend to write programs as—surprise!—applying the composite of a bunch of functions to some data. The basic operation for a monad is really just composition in a different guise, so functional programmers find this comforting. Functional programmers are also more likely to use “continuations”, which are something like extra-powerful exceptions that only work well when there is no global state; there’s a monad for making them easier to work with.

There are, however, some uses for monads that even imperative programmers find useful. Collections like sets and lists (with or without parentheses), parsers, promises, and membranes are a few examples, which I’ll explain below.

Collections

Many collection types support the following three operations:

  1. Map a function over the elements of the collection.
  2. Flatten a collection of collections into a collection.
  3. Create a collection from a single element.

A monad is a class that provides a generalized version of these three operations. When I say “generalized”, I mean that they satisfy some of the same rules that the collections’ operations satisfy in much the same way that multiplication of real numbers is associative and commutative just like addition of real numbers.

The way monads are usually used is by mapping a function and then flattening. If we have a function f that takes an element and returns a list, then we can say myList.map(f).flatten() and get a new list.

Parsers

A parser is an object with a list of tokens that have already been parsed and the remainder of the object (usually a string) to be parsed.

var Parser = function (obj, tokens) {
  this.obj = obj;
  // If tokens are not provided, use the empty list.
  this.tokens = tokens || [];
};

It has three operations like the collections above.

  1. Mapping a function over a parser applies the function to the contained obj.
    Parser.prototype.map = function (f) {
      return new Parser(f(this.obj), this.tokens);
    };
    
  2. Flattening a parser of parsers concatenates the list of tokens.
    Parser.prototype.flatten = function () {
      return new Parser(this.obj.obj, this.obj.tokens.concat(this.tokens));
    };
    

    The definition above means that

    new Parser(new Parser(x, tokens1), tokens2).flatten()
    is equivalent to
    new Parser(x, tokens1.concat(tokens2)).

  3. We can create a parser from an element x: new Parser(x).

If we have a function f that takes a string, either parses out some tokens or throws an exception, and returns a parser with the tokens and the remainder of the string, then we can say

myParser.map(f).flatten()

and get a new parser. In what follows, I create a parser with the string “Hi there” and then expect a word, then some whitespace, then another word.

var makeMatcher = function (re) {
  return function (s) {
    var m = s.match(re);
    if (!m) { throw new Error('Expected to match ' + re); }
    return new Parser(m[2], [m[1]]);
  };
};

var alnum = makeMatcher(/^([a-zA-Z0-9]+)(.*)/);
var whitespace = makeMatcher(/^(s+)(.*)/);

new Parser('Hi there')
    .map(alnum).flatten()
    .map(whitespace).flatten()
    .map(alnum).flatten(); 
// is equivalent to new Parser('', ['Hi', ' ', 'there']);

Promises

A promise is an object that represents the result of a computation that hasn’t finished yet; for example, if you send off a request over the network for a webpage, the promise would represent the text of the page. When the network transaction completes, the promise “resolves” and code that was waiting on the result gets executed.

  1. Mapping a function f over a promise for x results in a promise for f(x).
  2. When a promise represents remote data, a promise for a promise is still just remote data, so the two layers can be combined; see promise pipelining.
  3. We can create a resolved promise for any object that we already have.

If we have a function f that takes a value and returns a promise, then we can say

myPromise.map(f).flatten()

and get a new promise. By stringing together actions like this, we can set up a computation that will execute properly as various network actions complete.

Membranes

An object-capability language is an object-oriented programming language where you can’t get a reference to an object unless you create it or someone calls one of your methods and passes a reference to it. A “membrane” is a design pattern that implements access control.

Say you have a folder object with a bunch of file objects. You want to grant someone temporary access to the folder; if you give them a reference to the folder directly, you can’t force them to forget it, so that won’t work for revokable access. Instead, suppose you create a “proxy” object with a switch that only you control; if the switch is on, the object forwards all of its method calls to the folder and returns the results. If it’s off, it does nothing. Now you can give the person the object and turn it off when their time is up.

The problem with this is that the folder object may return a direct reference to the file objects it contains; the person could lose access to the folder but could retain access to some of the files in it. They would not be able to have access to any new files placed in the folder, but would see updates to the files they retained access to. If that is not your intent, then the proxy object should hide any file references it returns behind similar new proxy objects and wire all the switches together. That way, when you turn off the switch for the folder, all the switches turn off for the files as well.

This design pattern of wrapping object references that come out of a proxy in their own proxies is a membrane.

  1. We can map a function f over a membrane for x and get a membrane for f(x).
  2. A membrane for a membrane for x can be collapsed into a single membrane that checks both switches.
  3. Given any object, we can wrap it in a membrane.

If we have a function f that takes a value and returns a membrane, then we can say

myMembrane.map(f).flatten()

and get a new membrane. By stringing together actions like this, we can set up arbitrary reference graphs, while still preserving the membrane creator’s right to turn off access to his objects.

Conclusion

Monads implement the abstract operations map and flatten, and have an operation for creating a new monad out of any object. If you start with an instance m of a monad and you have a function f that takes an object and returns a monad, then you can say

m.map(f).flatten();

and get a new instance of a monad. You’ll often find scenarios where you repeat that process over and over.

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6 Responses

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  1. Rúnar Óli (@runarorama) said, on 2012 September 27 at 9:58 am

    What you have described is a semimonad. To have a monad you need a unit as well. It’s also important to mention that “flatten” is associative.

    • Rúnar Óli (@runarorama) said, on 2012 September 27 at 10:00 am

      Oh, never mind, I just read it too fast.

    • Mike Stay said, on 2012 September 27 at 10:28 am

      > You need a unit as well.
      The unit is property number 3 in each case.

      > It’s also important to mention that “flatten” is associative.
      I didn’t mention any of the axioms that a monad has to satisfy, since I didn’t want to get into the category theory in the main text. But yeah, flatten should be “associative” in the sense that if you have a list of lists of lists, it doesn’t matter in which order you apply flatten to get rid of the parentheses. It should also satisfy the left and right unit laws, in the sense that if you wrap each element in the list in brackets and then flatten, you get back the original list, and if you wrap the entire list in brackets and then flatten, you get back the original.

  2. Allan Erskine said, on 2012 September 27 at 7:45 pm

    This is cool! You could consider stealing Scala’s flatMap for your Parser example.

  3. beroal said, on 2012 October 9 at 12:59 pm

    Monads are a design pattern…
    Some time ago the universal thing was called “object”. “Everything is an object.” Now it is “design pattern”. “Everything is a design pattern”. I see progress, guys. That’s fantastic.

    • Mike Stay said, on 2012 October 9 at 1:03 pm

      Well, I could have said, “Monads are monoid objects in a monoidal category of endofunctors,” but that probably wouldn’t have gone over so well with my intended audience.


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